Frog-Bit, Japanese Barberry, and Nonpoint Source Pollution

For Friday, July 29, 2016

[audio https://dl.dropbox.com/s/z5x6ems4pqlju34/mr-great-lakes-7-29-16.mp3]

1 – The Saginaw Bay Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area exists to create and support collaborative invasive species management among federal and state agencies.

The group also works with municipalities, tribes, nonprofits, community organizations, schools, and private landowners.

Recently, members have been busy pulling European frog-bit.

 

frog-bit-cisma

European frog-bit. Via: MISIN

 

These invasive plants look like water lilies but are listed as a prohibited noxious weed by the state. They occur in shallow, slow-moving water on the edges of lakes and other places.

Earlier in July, the Saginaw Bay group spent time removing European frog-bit at the Bay City State Recreation Area.  

They worked with the state Department of Natural Resources and reportedly spent 10 hours removing the weed, gathering about 1,000 pounds of plant material.

Officials say frog-bit is a newer invasive species that is quickly spreading along Saginaw Bay.  

 

2 – Huron Pines staff are out conducting Floristic Quality Assessments along the Mason Tract, a special management area along the South Branch of the AuSable River that takes in about 4,500 acres.

The Gaylord nonprofit is working with local partners to push back invasive Japanese barberry. Japanese barberry is a spiny shrub that forms dense stands and competes with native trees and herbaceous plants, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Data from the work will help researchers understand the recovery and resiliency of the area’s special native plant communities.

Those interested can apply to be a seasonal stewardship technician with Huron Pines.

– Via http://icont.ac/3tbUt

 

3 – Nonpoint source pollution happens when rain, snowmelt, or wind carries pollutants off the land and into lakes, streams, wetlands, and other water bodies.

Michigan has a Nonpoint Source Program to assist local governments, nonprofits, and others in reducing this type of pollution by implementing plans to protect watersheds in the state.

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality anticipates that $4.3 million will be available in fiscal year 2017 for projects that implement recommendations in approved watershed management plans.

A webinar with more information is planned for Aug. 2. Projects are to awarded in the summer of 2017.

– Mr. Great Lakes is heard at 9 a.m. Fridays in Bay City, Michigan, on Delta College Q-90.1 FM NPR.

Follow @jeffkart on Twitter #MrGreatLakes

 

‘Great Lakes Soda’ Repels Asian Carp

For July 8, 2016

[audio https://dl.dropbox.com/s/aa4lntd3i1jkvcg/mr-great-lakes-7-8-16-environment-report.mp3]

1 – Making Great Lakes soda may help control Asian carp.

Researchers say adding carbon dioxide gas to water, a process similar to making carbonated soda, could help control the movement and behavior of invasive carp in the Great Lakes.

Bighead carp and silver carp are species of invasive Asian carp that threaten the Great Lakes.

Scientists with the University of Illinois and the U.S. Geological Survey tested the effectiveness of infusing water with carbon dioxide gas to discourage movement of the carp. Both carp species avoided CO2-infused water in a research pond in Wisconsin.

The study’s lead author says the responses provide evidence that CO2 could be used as a tool to deter the movement of bighead and silver carp.

Scientists say further tests are needed before CO2 can be used in Asian carp management.

The next research step is to test the usefulness of CO2 gas in controlling carp movement in a natural river.

 

2 – Visit the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge, and don’t forget your cell phone.

The refuge, located in Saginaw County, is putting on a Cell Phone Photography Contest.

The contest will be judged by adult and youth age groups.

Each group can submit photos that depict wildlife, or plants and landscapes.

The public will vote online for their favorite photos in the two categories from July 24-30.

Certificates and prizes will be awarded.

Photos will be displayed at the Green Point Environmental Learning Center and on the Refuge’s Facebook page.

– Mr. Great Lakes is heard at 9 a.m. Fridays in Bay City, Michigan, on Delta College Q-90.1 FM NPR.

Follow @jeffkart on Twitter #MrGreatLakes

Boat Launch Events for Invasive Species Week, Michigan-Ohio Energy Partnership

For July 1, 2016

[audio https://dl.dropbox.com/s/ynwghhz5zd1hbqk/mr-great-lakes-7-1-16.mp3]

1 – July 3-9 is Invasive Species Awareness Week in Michigan.

With recent discoveries of invasive New Zealand mud snails in the Au Sable and Pere Marquette rivers, state officials say the week takes on added importance.

new zealand mudsnails michigan deq

New Zealand mud snails. Credit: Michigan DEQ

Aquatic invasive species are non-native plants and animals that disrupt the natural ecosystem, tourism and the economy.

For Invasive Species Awareness Week, state departments are putting on outreach events at more than 50 boat launches.

The events, which include the Department of Environmental Quality and local volunteers, are meant to assist boaters in preventing the spread of aquatic invasives and comply with related laws.

Many invasive species, including New Zealand mud snails, are easily spread by boaters and anglers who use their equipment in multiple bodies of water without properly cleaning it.

2 – Michigan is working with Ohio boost the region’s advanced energy sector.

A new Clean Energy Manufacturing Roadmap was developed by state energy agencies in Michigan and Ohio.

It focuses on strategies for advancing energy efficient building technology and reducing energy costs related to clean energy manufacturing.

The effort was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and analyzed energy storage, LED lighting and electronics. The report puts a strong focus on increased research and development.

Officials say recommendations from the report can be used to build the region’s clean energy cluster and accelerate regional economic development.

– Mr. Great Lakes is heard at 9 a.m. Fridays in Bay City, Michigan, on Delta College Q-90.1 FM NPR.

Follow @jeffkart on Twitter #MrGreatLakes

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