Great Lakes Restoration, Phragmites and Insect Hotels

For Oct. 20, 2017

1- Great Lakes advocates gathered in Buffalo, New York, this week for the 13th annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference.

The event, hosted by the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition attracted hundreds of people from the Saginaw Bay area, other parts of Michigan, and other states. It occurred while Congress is working to finalize the federal budget.

Coalition officials say federal investments in the Great Lakes are producing results around the region, which benefit communities, the environment and the economy.

The coalition is urging Congress to maintain support for federal investments for programs to clean up toxic pollution and help fix wastewater and drinking water infrastructure.

The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition consists of more than 145 environmental, conservation, outdoor recreation organizations, zoos, aquariums and museums.

2 – School children are learning about the impacts of invasive plants.

Earlier this month, sixth graders from Tawas Area Schools visited a patch of phragmites that have developed on the property of the St. Joseph Health System in Tawas City.

Non-native phragmites, also know as common reed, can grow into tall stands and crowd out native plants and animals.

The hospital wanted to treat for the plants and worked with the nonprofit Huron Pines in Gaylord to turn the request into a learning experience for the students.

Student activities included calculating the density of the patch, dissecting the plant, mapping the site, and journaling ideas for future site plans.

The students and teachers plan to continue the lessons by bringing the data back to the classroom for further discussion.

3 – Hotels have been built in a nature preserve.

 

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An insect hotel. Credit: Little Forks Conservancy

Don’t worry though, these hotels are for insects.

A Boy Scout built and installed the insect hotels for the Little Forks Conservancy of Midland.

The conservancy says these hotels are great for gardens and natural areas. The insects that check in are friendly pollinators and creatures that help control harmful bugs. The hotels are stuffed with materials to attract various insects.

Ten hotels were installed along the trail at the Averill Preserve and Riverview Natural Area. They will be seeded by the Chippewa Nature Center in the spring with native wildflowers and grasses.

– Mr. Great Lakes is heard at 9:30 a.m. Fridays in Bay City, Michigan, on Delta College Q-90.1 FM NPR. Follow @jeffkart on Twitter #MrGreatLakes

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OktoberForest Campaign and Open Burning Information

For Oct. 13, 2017

 

1 – More than 20 breweries in Michigan have joined an OktoberForest campaign by The Nature Conservancy to raise awareness about the importance of forests to freshwater.

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An OktoberForest coaster. Credit: TNC

That includes Tri City Brewing in Bay City.

The OktoberForest campaign aims to educate beer fans about the link between the health of America’s forests and water, which is the main ingredient in beer.  

Twenty one Michigan breweries are participating out of 81 nationwide, the most of any state.

Coasters with information about OktoberForest can be found at breweries including Tri City Brewing in Bay City and Midland Brewing in Midland, along with Paddle Hard Brewing in Grayling and Snowbelt Brewing Co. in Gaylord.

Forests help improve water supplies in a number of ways. Forests shade streams, lakes and snow from evaporation; the forest floor helps filter sediment; and tree roots help hold soil together so it can store water.

2 –  The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has information on open burning in the state.

Open burning is the burning of unwanted materials like brush, leaves and grass. It pollutes the air and poses a forest fire hazard, state regulators say. And there are various rules that people need to follow.

For instance, you can’t burn hazardous materials, chemicals, tires, trash, plastics or electronics. If you live 1,400 feet outside of an incorporated city or village limit, you can burn brush and trees. If you want to burn grass and leaves, you need to check with your local government.

Go to Michigan.gov/burnpermit to see if you need a burn permit. State regulators say the rules are in place to protect people and the environment.

– Mr. Great Lakes is heard at 9:30 a.m. Fridays in Bay City, Michigan, on Delta College Q-90.1 FM NPR. Follow @jeffkart on Twitter #MrGreatLakes

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