Bringing Back the Arctic Grayling, Looking for Frogs

For March 3, 2017

1 – The Arctic grayling hasn’t been seen in Michigan waters since the 1930s.

But reintroduction of the fish has edged a step closer.

arctic-grayling-2.JPG

Arctic grayling. Credit: Michigan DNR

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Little River Band of Ottawa Indians and Michigan Technological University have received a grant to support efforts to bring back the extirpated fish to Michigan waters.

Michigan’s Arctic Grayling Initiative consists of 32 organizations that are working reintroduce the species.

The $117,175 grant from the Consumers Energy Foundation will fund work this year to address two immediate needs for a successful reintroduction.

The first is the collection of habitat and fish community data in the upper Big Manistee River, where the fish used to live

The second is to create an outreach plan to engage Michigan citizens in the reintroduction efforts.

Members of Michigan’s Arctic Grayling Initiative have met twice to identify knowledge gaps and discuss management and stocking strategies and public outreach.

State officials say the information collected through the grant will help guide management agencies in selecting appropriate reintroduction sites.

2 – Volunteers are needed to help with a frog and toad survey.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is seeking volunteers throughout the state.

Declining populations of frogs, toads and other amphibians have been documented worldwide since the 1980s. Studies suggest amphibians are disappearing due to habitat loss, pollution, disease and collection.

Michigan’s annual frog and toad survey helps biologists monitor frog and toad abundance and distribution in the state. Michigan has the second-longest-running such survey in the country, after Wisconsin.

Michigan’s surveys are conducted along a system of permanent survey routes, each consisting of 10 wetland sites. The sites are visited three times during spring, when frogs and toads are actively breeding. Observers listen for calling frogs and toads at each site, identify the species present, and make an estimate of abundance.

Those interested in volunteering may contact Lori Sargent at 517-284-6216 or SargentL@michigan.gov.


– Mr. Great Lakes is heard at 9:30 a.m. Fridays in Bay City, Michigan, on Delta College Q-90.1 FM NPR. Follow @jeffkart on Twitter #MrGreatLakes

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