BaySail Seeks Trainees, Refuge Considers Commercial Guides, State Surveys Fish

For June 2, 2017

 

1 – BaySail in Bay City is offering Windward Bound Voyages.

They take place on board the 65-foot Appledore V schooner.

Teenagers from 14-18 can join a professional tall ship crew to learn about navigation, sailing, and the Great Lakes ecosystem.

Windward Bound graduates are eligible to join a year-round training program and enjoy future sailing opportunities as volunteers,

The voyage schedule includes a trip from Bay City to Buffalo, New York, in June, and others through August.

A limited number of scholarships are available for teens from Bay, Midland, Saginaw and Isabella counties.

For a complete schedule and an application, see BaySailBayCity.org.

 

2 – The Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge is seeking public comment on a plan to allow commercial guides for wildlife observation and photography.

Officials say wildlife observation and photography by the public was previously determined to be compatible with a refuge conservation plan.

Officials are seeking comment on a similar plan that expands this use to include commercial guiding for wildlife observation and photography.

Comments are being taken for two weeks, ending June 14, at the refuge website and on its Facebook page.

All commercial guides would be required to apply for a Special Use Permit and steps would be taken to minimize impacts to wildlife.

3 – All four of the state’s fisheries research vessels are back on the water, beginning their annual surveys of Great Lakes fish populations for the Department of Natural Resources.

The surveys are designed to examine and collect information on fish communities and their habitats.

The research vessels are based in Marquette, Alpena, Charlevoix and Harrison Township.

They work throughout the Great Lakes, beginning as soon as ice has cleared and continuing into November.

On Lake Huron, work is done by the research vessel Tanner, the DNR’s newest vessel which was launched in 2016. This vessel focuses on assessments of lake trout and walleye populations, and broader fisheries assessments in Saginaw Bay and the St. Marys River.

 

A New Saginaw Bay Research Vessel, and Cleaning Up Microplastics

Mr. Great Lakes. With Jeff Kart. As heard at 9 a.m. Fridays on Friday Edition, Delta College Q-90.1 FM. The report for Sept. 20, 2013:

1 – There’s a new research vessel plying the Great Lakes.

It’s called “Cardinal II,” and is the new flagship of the Saginaw Bay Environmental Science Institute at Saginaw Valley State University.

The 24-foot boat was christened at a ceremony on Thursday (Sept. 19) at the university, with help from a director from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.

SVSU officials say Cardinal II will be used for water sampling and related activities.

It will support SVSU’s Saginaw Bay Environmental Science Institute, serving as a mobile classroom for students and faculty researchers.

SVSU recently received a $413,000 grant from the University of Michigan Water Center to support additional ecological studies of Saginaw Bay and develop priorities guide future conservation efforts.

The new research vessel Cardinal II joins others on the bay, including four boats used by the state Department of Natural Resources to study fish populations.

2 – On Saturday (Sept. 21), Adopt-a-Beach cleanups will be taking place throughout the Great Lakes, including on Saginaw Bay.

The public beach at the Bay City State Recreation Area in Bay County is among the sites for the annual cleanup, conducted by volunteers and organized by the Alliance for the Great Lakes.

Cleanups are happening elsewhere in Michigan,  Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

This September’s cleanup is noteworthy because it’s about more than regular manmade debris, like cigarette butts and plastic bags.

There’s the ongoing issue of microbeads that have been found in the Great Lakes. The beads, also called microplastics, are blamed on household beauty and cleaning products that aren’t removed in the wastewater treatment process.

During the cleanups, volunteers will be collecting data and helping support regional research on the tiny plastic particles.

According to the Alliance, the impacts of these particles could include absorption and transport of other chemical contaminants, ingestion by aquatic organisms, or effects on microbial communities in freshwater ecosystems.

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